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Yoga breathing

Should I Breathe through Nose or Mouth?

People are asking me in my yoga class that which is good for me, either breathing through nose or mouth – what’s important?

Certain individuals, whether children or adults, have a tendency to breathe through the mouth instead of the nose.

In general:  Nasal breathing is healthier than mouth breathing for several reasons. Your lungs take oxygen from the air, and absorption of oxygen happens mostly on exhalation. Exhaling through the nose, which is smaller than the mouth, creates greater air pressure and therefore a slower exhalation. This gives the lungs extra time to extract a greater amount of oxygen.

And if you’re asthmatic,you may want to make a general effort to breathe nasally, as mouth breathing may exacerbate asthma. Chronic mouth breathing can not only affect your quality of life, but your life, period.

Your nose has vital nervous system connections to your lungs and heart. Not breathing well through your nose can alter your heart rate and blood pressure, as well as to increasing your stress response.
Your nose makes about 2 pints of mucous every day. If your nose isn’t working properly and mucous isn’t cleared, the stagnant mucous can lead to infections such as sinusitis or ear infections.

Lastly, not breathing well through your nose can aggravate snoring or obstructive sleep apnea. Nasal congestion alone doesn’t cause obstructive sleep apnea, but it can definitely aggravate it. If your palate and tongue structures are predisposed to falling back easily due to sleeping on your back and muscle relaxation in deep sleep, then having a stuffy nose can aggravate further collapse downstream. Untreated obstructive sleep apnea can lead to chronic fatigue, depression, anxiety, weight gain, high blood pressure, heart disease, heart attack and stroke.

In Yoga: Whether you are exercising mild includes yoga, sleeping or going about daily life, it is preferable to do nasal breathing rather than mouth breathing. When you breathe through your mouth, your brain is tricked into thinking that carbon dioxide is escaping the body too quickly. This stimulates the production of mucous, as the body attempts to slow the breathing.use obstructive sleep apnea, but it can definitely aggravate it. If your palate and tongue structures are predisposed to falling back easily due to sleeping on your back and muscle relaxation in deep sleep, then having a stuffy nose can aggravate further collapse downstream. Untreated obstructive sleep apnea can lead to chronic fatigue, depression, anxiety, weight gain, high blood pressure, heart disease, heart attack and stroke.

Just breathe. It doesn’t matter whether you’re breathing out of your nose or your mouth while you exercise hard. When you’re working hard, breathe through your mouth helps to take in enough oxygen. If you concentrating on your breathing that keep you calm or mentally focused while training and competing, go ahead. Just don’t force yourself to breathe out of your nose if it isn’t comfortable.

When you do light exercise, you can breathe through the nose where you’re at about two to three times your resting breathing rate. At that point you exceed four to six times your resting breathing rate (exercise hard, sometimes running)—taking in 20 to 35 liters of air per minute – you have to breathe out through mouth, you can’t push 21 liters of air through your nose comfortably.

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